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General safety precautions:
As with any travel to foreign or unknown countries, all students should remain aware of their surroundings and never stray from their group. Should they feel uncomfortable for any reason at any time, they should immediately speak with their brigade coordinator or a staff member and can be brought home.

For UK Volunteers, please visit our page Health & Safety Precautions for UK

Health & Safety Precautions

The Global Brigades entity in Honduras has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers.

 

It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has built very strong relationships with the communities in which we work and is very aware of the safety and security environment  of each community. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

What we understand

Global Brigades understands that traveling to a new part of the world can be daunting not only for volunteers but also friends and family that are supporting your brigade. Global Brigades number one priority is volunteer safety and we have created this FAQ page to help address concerns you may have about safety and security of our programs.

  

What kind of security and staff is provided?

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers. As a precautionary measure, in Honduras, all groups are also accompanied by an armed security officer (either Honduran police or military) at all times for the entirety of the program.

 

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

 

What is the relationship between the local entity and police? 

GB Honduras has maintained very strong and formal relationships with the Honduran National and Local Police, and the national military in Honduras. All of these entities are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

  

What is the involvement of the U.S Embassy and Department of State?

Prior to each brigade, all volunteers are registered in the U.S. Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

 

Should I be concerned about the US State Department's Travel Warning for Honduras?

Please review Global Brigades' most recent response to the Travel Advisory in Honduras.

 

What criteria does GB Honduras use when selecting transportation vendors?

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers. All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition. All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Honduran government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government. Lastly, Global Brigades Honduras only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.

 

Are the communities safe? 

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the operations team of the local Global Brigades office to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities?

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well-maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location varies between approximately 30 minutes to 2 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Have there ever been any incidents related to criminal activity?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Global Brigades has not experienced any incidents related to criminal activity in the 14+ years that the organization has been working in Honduras.

 

Are volunteers ever alone?

Volunteers are never left alone; Global Brigades staff remain with all groups for the entire duration of their brigade. All volunteers are given explicit directives to remain with their group at all times during the program.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

All program countries have detailed evacuation plans in place in the event volunteers need to be removed from the program site or country due to an emergency. All volunteers are covered by the Global Brigades Travel Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of an emergency? 

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

 • GB International Office, +1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

 

Honduran Contacts:

 • Luis Torres – Executive Director of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9488-7997 (Honduran Mobile)

 • Mario Quan – Administrative Director of Global Brigades Honduras, +504-9851-3892 (Honduran Mobile)

  

Should I be concerned about Zika virus? 

Global Brigades operates based on recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO does not currently recommend any general restriction of travel or trade with countries, areas and/or territories with Zika virus transmission. As a precaution against all mosquito-borne illnesses, Global Brigades has fumigated all lodging facilities prior to the arrival of volunteers. For more information, please see the WHO's Information for Travellers Visiting Zika Affected Countries.

 

What if a volunteer gets ill during a brigade? 

With common, non-urgent illnesses, volunteers can be seen by a staff paramedic or physician. In severe cases, or by request of the volunteer, Global Brigades can arrange communication to family members or transportation back to the volunteer's home country. Depending on the severity or nature of the illness, transportation home may be partially or fully covered by Global Brigades' travel insurance.

The Global Brigades entity in Panama has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers.


It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has built very strong relationships with the communities in which we work and is very aware of the safety and security environment  of each community. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

 

What we understand

Global Brigades understands that traveling to a new part of the world can be daunting not only for volunteers but also friends and family that are supporting your brigade. Global Brigades number one priority is volunteer safety and we have created this FAQ page to help address concerns you may have about safety and security of our programs.

 

What kind of security and staff is provided? 

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers.

 

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

What is Global Brigades' relationship between the local entity and police? 

GB Panama has maintained very strong relationships with the local Panamanian police authorities in the regions of the country we work in. These authorities, as well as the Panamanian government are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

What is the involvement of the US Embassy and Department of State? 

Prior to each brigade, all volunteers are registered in the U.S. Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

 

What criteria does GB Panama use when selecting transportation vendors? 

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers. All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition. All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Panamanian government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government. Lastly, Global Brigades Panama only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.

 

Are the communities safe?

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the operations team of the local Global Brigades office to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities? 

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Global Brigades has not experienced any incidents related to criminal activity in Panama.
 

Are volunteers ever alone?

Volunteers are never left alone; Global Brigades staff remain with all groups for the entire duration of their brigade. All volunteers are given explicit directives to remain with their group at all times during the program.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

All program countries have detailed evacuation plans in place in the event volunteers need to be removed from the program site or country due to an emergency. All volunteers are covered by the Global Brigades Travel Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of an emergency?

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

 • GB International Office, +1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

 

Panama Contact:

 • Juan David Villegas - Country Director of Global Brigades Panama, +507-6104-8465 (Panamanian Mobile)

 

Should I be concerned about the Zika virus? 

Global Brigades operates based on recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO does not currently recommend any general restriction of travel or trade with countries, areas and/or territories with Zika virus transmission. As a precaution against all mosquito-borne illnesses, Global Brigades has fumigated all lodging facilities prior to the arrival of volunteers. For more information, please see the WHO's Information for Travellers Visiting Zika Affected Countries

 

What if a volunteer gets ill during a brigade?

With common, non-urgent illnesses, volunteers can be seen by a staff paramedic or physician. In severe cases, or by request of the volunteer, Global Brigades can arrange communication to family members or transportation back to the volunteer's home country. Depending on the severity or nature of the illness, transportation home may be partially or fully covered by Global Brigades' travel insurance.

The Global Brigades entity in Nicaragua has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers.


It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has built very strong relationships with the communities in which we work and is very aware of the safety and security environment  of each community. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact admin@globalbrigades.org.

  

 

What we understand

Global Brigades understands that traveling to a new part of the world can be daunting not only for volunteers but also friends and family that are supporting your brigade. Global Brigades number one priority is volunteer safety and we have created this FAQ page to help address concerns you may have about safety and security of our programs.

 

What kind of security and staff is provided?

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers.

 

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

 

What is the relationship between the local entity and police?

GB Nicaragua has maintained very strong relationships with the local Nicaraguan police authorities in the regions of the country we work in. These authorities, as well as the Nicaraguan government are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

What is the involvement of the U.S. Embassy and Department of State?

Prior to each brigade, all volunteers are registered in the U.S. Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

What criteria does GB Nicaragua use when selecting transportation vendors? 

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers. All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition. All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Nicaraguan government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government. Lastly, Global Brigades Nicaragua only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.

 

Are the communities safe? 

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the operations team of the local Global Brigades office to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities? 

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well-maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location varies between approximately 30 minutes to 2 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Have there ever been any incidents related to criminal activity?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Global Brigades has not experienced any incidents related to criminal activity in Nicaragua.

 

Are volunteers ever alone?

Volunteers are never left alone; Global Brigades staff remain with all groups for the entire duration of their brigade. All volunteers are given explicit directives to remain with their group at all times during the program.

What if the group has to be evacuated? 

All program countries have detailed evacuation plans in place in the event volunteers need to be removed from the program site or country due to an emergency. All volunteers are covered by the Global Brigades Travel Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of emergency? 

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

 • GB International Office, +1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

 

Nicaragua Contacts:

 • Pablo Garron - Executive Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-5827-0413 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

 • Stephan Pillon - Operations Director of Global Brigades Nicaragua, +505-8720-1654 (Nicaraguan Mobile)

 

Should I be concerned about the Zika virus? 

Global Brigades operates based on recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO does not currently recommend any general restriction of travel or trade with countries, areas and/or territories with Zika virus transmission. As a precaution against all mosquito-borne illnesses, Global Brigades has fumigated all lodging facilities prior to the arrival of volunteers. For more information, please see the WHO's Information for Travellers Visiting Zika Affected Countries

 

What if a volunteer gets ill during a brigade?

With common, non-urgent illnesses, volunteers can be seen by a staff paramedic or physician. In severe cases, or by request of the volunteer, Global Brigades can arrange communication to family members or transportation back to the volunteer's home country. Depending on the severity or nature of the illness, transportation home may be partially or fully covered by Global Brigades' travel insurance.

The Global Brigades entity in Ghana has the responsibility of administering regular risk assessments of the current political situation, the location of lodging facilities and communities, and transportation provided to volunteers.

 

It is important to keep in mind that the communities we work in are largely isolated and far away from major cities where crime is more prevalent. Global Brigades has built very strong relationships with the communities in which we work and is very aware of the safety and security environment  of each community. We urge parents and volunteers to understand that crime committed in the major cities of the countries we work in does not mean that the entire country is unsafe. For example, if there was a riot in downtown Dallas, we would not assume that the entire state of Texas is unsafe and that the people in Houston are at risk. Please consider the nature of our work in isolated areas when reading any negative press about the danger of the countries that we are working in. Should you have any questions or concerns about Global Brigades' safety please contact admin@globalbrigades.org.

 

What we understand

Global Brigades understands that traveling to a new part of the world can be daunting not only for volunteers but also friends and family that are supporting your brigade. Global Brigades number one priority is volunteer safety and we have created this FAQ page to help address concerns you may have about safety and security of our programs.

 

What kind of security and staff is provided? 

Every group is accompanied by at least one trained Brigade Coordinator, a full logistics team, and trained drivers.

 

While in the community, Brigade Coordinators are in charge of maintaining a professional and safe work environment for the volunteers and the community. All coordinators are trained to assist first aid emergencies at the locations. Special transportation is on-call 24/7 during the brigade in case of major emergencies or complete evacuation from the location.

 

What is the relationship between the local entity and police?

GB Ghana has maintained very strong relationships with the local Ghanaian police authorities in the regions of the country we work in. These authorities, as well as the Ghanaian government are aware and supportive of volunteer activities and have worked together successfully for years to support the volunteers. Furthermore, GB's community projects are only done in rural areas where crime is low (if barely existent) and where relationships have been long established.

 

What is the involvement of the U.S. Embassy and Department of State?

Prior to each brigade, all volunteers are registered in the U.S. Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). Additionally, Global Brigades in-country entities are in close contact with the Embassy and are notified of any safety advisories.

What criteria does GB Ghana use when selecting transportation vendors?

All vendors must be in full compliance with all local laws and regulations required by the government in order to transport passengers. All vehicles being provided must be recent models and in excellent working condition. All drivers must possess the appropriate special driver's license that is required by the Ghanaian government, qualifying them to drive the types of buses that are being provided. In order to obtain this license, drivers have to pass a special driving test administered by the government. Lastly, Global Brigades Ghana only works with established vendors in the transportation field who have extensive experience in the business of transporting passengers.

 

Are the communities safe? 

Before entering a community, the GB Research and Evaluation (R&E) team collects baseline data, assesses community needs and secures buy-in from the local leadership. Each community is visited by the operations team of the local Global Brigades office to ensure that it is secure and safe for transporting the volunteers to and from the community. If the in-country leadership team ever feels that the safety of volunteers is compromised in any way, volunteers would be immediately withdrawn from the community.

 

How accessible are the communities?

All communities must be accessible through paved roads or well-maintained dirt roads (used mostly during summer) by normal vehicles or four wheel drive. The driving time to the location varies between approximately 30 minutes to 2 hours from where the volunteers are staying.

Have there ever been any incidents related to criminal activity?

Global Brigades has an exceptional track record for brigade security because of the involvement of local law enforcement, hired security, and strong relationships with local communities leaders. Groups have only experienced incidents typical of any international travel, such as petty theft. Global Brigades has not experienced any incidents related to criminal activity in Ghana.

 

Are volunteers ever alone?

Volunteers are never left alone; Global Brigades staff remain with all groups for the entire duration of their brigade. All volunteers are given explicit directives to remain with their group at all times during the program.

What if the group has to be evacuated?

All program countries have detailed evacuation plans in place in the event volunteers need to be removed from the program site or country due to an emergency. All volunteers are covered by the Global Brigades Travel Insurance Policy. The in-country Program Associates will work with the Brigade Coordinators, local embassy, and airlines to ensure that the group departs immediately and safely.

Who do I contact in case of emergency?

If there is an emergency situation where the family needs to get a hold of the volunteer immediately, please contact the appropriate team members listed below:

 

Emergency Travel Contact:

 • GB International Office, +1-206-489-4798, or email admin@globalbrigades.org

 

Ghana Contacts:

 • Benson Adjei - Operations Director of Global Brigades Ghana, +233-265524850 (Ghanaian mobile)

 

Should I be concerned about the Ebola virus?

There have been no cases of Ebola in Ghana. For more information, please see the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Case Count

 

What if a volunteer gets ill during a brigade?

With common, non-urgent illnesses, volunteers can be seen by a staff paramedic or physician. In severe cases, or by request of the volunteer, Global Brigades can arrange communication to family members or transportation back to the volunteer's home country. Depending on the severity or nature of the illness, transportation home may be partially or fully covered by Global Brigades' travel insurance.

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